Torrontes Proves Argentina More Than Just a One-Trick Pony

When you think of Argentina what comes to mind? Tango? Gauchos and pampas? Cattle ranching? Malbec? Argentina is a country with a rising, no, shooting star.

A country of unique features and contrasts it has the eighth largest land mass in the world (over 1 million square miles), some of the highest mountains (Aconcagua, 22,834’), it is three times as long (north to south) as its widest point (870 mi), glaciers, deserts, mountains, and plains. Argentina is a thoroughly modern country with European influences, a relatively high level of per capita income, and one of the highest literacy rates in the world, at 97%. The total population is 38 million, a whopping 35% of who live in the capital city of Buenos Aires. Argentina has a number of fascinating facts relative to its wine culture, such as growing grapes at the highest elevations in the world (as high as 9,800’ in Colomé), and at the lowest latitude, 43° in the Patagonia province.

Argentina’s wine culture was well established long before many other new world wine regions. Sixteenth century Spanish missionaries and conquistadores brought their favorite vines over with them as they explored and settled in South America. Malbec is the red grape most associated with Argentina. It found more favorable growing conditions in Argentina than its native Rhone region of southwest France. Known for its firm tannins, purple hues, plum flavors and licorice and spice notes Malbec is the perfect complement to the diet of red meats so prevalent in Argentina. Malbec in Argentina is also able to grow in its unadulterated, un-grafted state. Imported long before the phylloxera epidemic that devastated Europe’s grapevines, causing most of Europe to remedy the situation by grafting American rootstock onto native vines. Ever vigilant, on the lookout for any first indications of the dreaded phylloxera louse, many Argentine winegrowers plant rose shrubs at the ends of rows to be a warning beacon. The arid, desert/mesa climate with low humidity and annual rainfall amounts, combined with the prevailing winds naturally protect Argentina’s vines from the overuse of sulphur, pesticides, and various other treatments found to be necessary to ensure a good crop elsewhere in the world.


Up until the 1970’s Malbec was referred to locally as “the French” grape. Quality was not the key factor in production and consequently it was over-planted. Argentina is the fifth largest wine producing country in the world, with over 540,000 acres under vineyard cultivation. Untils the 1990’s not much of that product found its way out of the country. Winemakers had not paid much heed to the export markets and the wine remained relatively unknown to the rest of the world. All of that changed back in the 1990’s when the country’s own internal financial struggles forced Argentina’s winegrowers to experience a fundamental shift from quantity output to quality wine production. Vines were ripped out, yields were controlled, and attention was paid to which clones were oenologically superior. Argentina is now more export-oriented and one of hottest value wine regions in the world. Their wines enjoy an excellent quality to price ratio and are extremely food-friendly.

Selected Torrontes Wines


• 2010 Luigi Bosca Finca La Linda Torrontes

• 2010 Doña Paula Estate Torrontes

• 2010 Bodegas Catena Zapata Alamos Torrontes

• 2010 Michel Torino Don David Torrontes

• 2007 Cielo Estate Grown Torrontes

• 2009 Valentin Bianchi Sensual Torrontes

• 2010 Crios de Susana Balbo Torrontes

February 15, 2012 by Lorie Perrone

Filed under FCG, Wine Conversation
 

When you think of Argentina what comes to mind? Tango? Gauchos and pampas? Cattle ranching? Malbec? Argentina is a country with a rising, no, shooting star.
A country of unique features and contrasts it has the eighth largest land mass in the world (over 1 million square miles), some of the highest mountains (Aconcagua, 22,834’), it is three times as long (north to south) as its widest point (870 mi), glaciers, deserts, mountains, and plains. Argentina is a thoroughly modern country with European influences, a relatively high level of per capita income, and one of the highest literacy rates in the world, at 97%. The total population is 38 million, a whopping 35% of who live in the capital city of Buenos Aires. Argentina has a number of fascinating facts relative to its wine culture, such as growing grapes at the highest elevations in the world (as high as 9,800’ in Colomé), and at the lowest latitude, 43° in the Patagonia province.
 

Argentina’s wine culture was well established long before many other new world wine regions. Sixteenth century Spanish missionaries and conquistadores brought their favorite vines over with them as they explored and settled in South America. Malbec is the red grape most associated with Argentina. It found more favorable growing conditions in Argentina than its native Rhone region of southwest France. Known for its firm tannins, purple hues, plum flavors and licorice and spice notes Malbec is the perfect complement to the diet of red meats so prevalent in Argentina. Malbec in Argentina is also able to grow in its unadulterated, un-grafted state. Imported long before the phylloxera epidemic that devastated Europe’s grapevines, causing most of Europe to remedy the situation by grafting American rootstock onto native vines. Ever vigilant, on the lookout for any first indications of the dreaded phylloxera louse, many Argentine winegrowers plant rose shrubs at the ends of rows to be a warning beacon. The arid, desert/mesa climate with low humidity and annual rainfall amounts, combined with the prevailing winds naturally protect Argentina’s vines from the overuse of sulphur, pesticides, and various other treatments found to be necessary to ensure a good crop elsewhere in the world.
 

Up until the 1970’s Malbec was referred to locally as “the French” grape. Quality was not the key factor in production and consequently it was over-planted. Argentina is the fifth largest wine producing country in the world, with over 540,000 acres under vineyard cultivation. Untils the 1990’s not much of that product found its way out of the country. Winemakers had not paid much heed to the export markets and the wine remained relatively unknown to the rest of the world. All of that changed back in the 1990’s when the country’s own internal financial struggles forced Argentina’s winegrowers to experience a fundamental shift from quantity output to quality wine production. Vines were ripped out, yields were controlled, and attention was paid to which clones were oenologically superior. Argentina is now more export-oriented and one of hottest value wine regions in the world. Their wines enjoy an excellent quality to price ratio and are extremely food-friendly.
 


Selected Torrontes Wines


• 2010 Luigi Bosca Finca La Linda Torrontes

• 2010 Doña Paula Estate Torrontes

• 2010 Bodegas Catena Zapata Alamos Torrontes

• 2010 Michel Torino Don David Torrontes

• 2007 Cielo Estate Grown Torrontes

• 2009 Valentin Bianchi Sensual Torrontes

• 2010 Crios de Susana Balbo Torrontes


February 15, 2012 by Lorie Perrone

Filed under FCG, Wine Conversation

When you think of Argentina what comes to mind? Tango? Gauchos and pampas? Cattle ranching? Malbec? Argentina is a country with a rising, no, shooting star.
A country of unique features and contrasts it has the eighth largest land mass in the world (over 1 million square miles), some of the highest mountains (Aconcagua, 22,834’), it is three times as long (north to south) as its widest point (870 mi), glaciers, deserts, mountains, and plains. Argentina is a thoroughly modern country with European influences, a relatively high level of per capita income, and one of the highest literacy rates in the world, at 97%. The total population is 38 million, a whopping 35% of who live in the capital city of Buenos Aires. Argentina has a number of fascinating facts relative to its wine culture, such as growing grapes at the highest elevations in the world (as high as 9,800’ in Colomé), and at the lowest latitude, 43° in the Patagonia province.
 


Argentina’s wine culture was well established long before many other new world wine regions. Sixteenth century Spanish missionaries and conquistadores brought their favorite vines over with them as they explored and settled in South America. Malbec is the red grape most associated with Argentina. It found more favorable growing conditions in Argentina than its native Rhone region of southwest France. Known for its firm tannins, purple hues, plum flavors and licorice and spice notes Malbec is the perfect complement to the diet of red meats so prevalent in Argentina. Malbec in Argentina is also able to grow in its unadulterated, un-grafted state. Imported long before the phylloxera epidemic that devastated Europe’s grapevines, causing most of Europe to remedy the situation by grafting American rootstock onto native vines. Ever vigilant, on the lookout for any first indications of the dreaded phylloxera louse, many Argentine winegrowers plant rose shrubs at the ends of rows to be a warning beacon. The arid, desert/mesa climate with low humidity and annual rainfall amounts, combined with the prevailing winds naturally protect Argentina’s vines from the overuse of sulphur, pesticides, and various other treatments found to be necessary to ensure a good crop elsewhere in the world.
 


Up until the 1970’s Malbec was referred to locally as “the French” grape. Quality was not the key factor in production and consequently it was over-planted. Argentina is the fifth largest wine producing country in the world, with over 540,000 acres under vineyard cultivation. Untils the 1990’s not much of that product found its way out of the country. Winemakers had not paid much heed to the export markets and the wine remained relatively unknown to the rest of the world. All of that changed back in the 1990’s when the country’s own internal financial struggles forced Argentina’s winegrowers to experience a fundamental shift from quantity output to quality wine production. Vines were ripped out, yields were controlled, and attention was paid to which clones were oenologically superior. Argentina is now more export-oriented and one of hottest value wine regions in the world. Their wines enjoy an excellent quality to price ratio and are extremely food-friendly.
 


Selected Torrontes Wines


• 2010 Luigi Bosca Finca La Linda Torrontes

• 2010 Doña Paula Estate Torrontes

• 2010 Bodegas Catena Zapata Alamos Torrontes

• 2010 Michel Torino Don David Torrontes

• 2007 Cielo Estate Grown Torrontes

• 2009 Valentin Bianchi Sensual Torrontes

• 2010 Crios de Susana Balbo Torrontes



February 15, 2012 by Lorie Perrone

Filed under FCG, Wine Conversation